CEO Evaluations!

Who’s coaching the head coach?
Most organizations take great care in defining the characteristics they value in their new hires and emerging leaders. Performance evaluations and leadership development programs focus on soft skills that create an organization’s desired culture and brand experience. As new leaders are groomed, they are challenged to define and hone their style, placing emphasis on not just their business results, but how they achieved them. Through this process, emerging leaders are given open and honest feedback from their mentors and bosses, and when done well, this process creates strong leaders – our next CEOs.

But what then? A five-year old once asked me what a CEO is. I responded, “it stands for Chief Executive Officer, but you can think of it as the boss of all the bosses.” This was fascinating to a kindergartener, who beamed, “Awesome…that means she can do whatever she wants?”

After a brief chuckle, let’s pause. Assuredly a leader entrusted with this coveted role isn’t simply doing whatever they want, but, yes, they’ve earned the autonomy to run their organization. They passed the tests, reflected, adjusted and grew… all the way to the top. But does that mean they no longer need feedback?

CEO Evaluation
Chief executive officers sit in the one seat on the organizational chart that isn’t below another box. Rather than having a direct leader, in most organizations, they are governed by a board of directors. Consistent coaching and dialogue are replaced by monthly status meetings where financials take center stage. Annual performance evaluations are generally replaced by annual compensation reviews that too often are entirely metric based.

While achieving the desired financial results of the business can be an outcome of strong leadership, CEOs committed to continuously improving themselves and the business want more. Stephen P. Kaufman, 14-year CEO of Arrow Electronics wrote for the Harvard Business Review:

Limiting performance management to only financial measures makes little sense. All the incentives in the world won’t transform CEOs into better decision makers. And when CEOs stumble or fall, they pull their companies down with them. Boards have an obligation to shareholders to ensure that companies are led well.

HR Directors and boards can collaborate to create a stronger CEO evaluation process, including these three essentials:

 1.Leadership Style

Before any organization created financial goals, they had a vision. The organization’s purpose and core values should be upheld and enhanced by its Chief Executive Officer. Boards should reinforce and strengthen as necessary the alignment between the CEO’s priorities and performance, and the mission, vision, and goals of the organization.

 2.Leadership Relationships

Guiding an entire organization doesn’t rest solely on the shoulders of the CEO, they are surrounded by a management team and advised by a board of directors. Well-lead organizations have a unified team of leaders. This means not that healthy debate isn’t fostered or that differing views aren’t valued, it means that the CEO isn’t a lone ranger. Boards should see and hear from other key leaders and have a sense for how a CEO is regarded by his or her team.

3.Objective Measures

Financial performance is just one set of measures a board should use to evaluate a CEO. Think back to the mission and vision of the organization and define other tangible goals that are markers of success. For example, if you are running a cooperative or membership organization, you may consider not just the number of members you have, but how they score the service they receive. If you are a family-founded company that prides itself on being a great place to work, you may consider measuring employee retention and satisfaction. Think not just of the financial outcomes you want your business to achieve but identify measures that are earlier indicators of success or barometers of sustainability.

 Get in-FUSED

We created in-FUSION Group 10 years ago with the vision to be more than a consultancy. We dig in and work with our partners, becoming a part of your team and your organization. The senior team at in-FUSION Group has more than 70 years of leadership experience and has worked with numerous organizations to improve their CEO and Board evaluation processes.

We quoted Harvard Business Review to bring you this paper. Read their great article on CEO evaluations here:

https://hbr.org/2008/10/evaluating-the-ceo

Communication – The Secret Ingredient!

Communication: The secret ingredient 

We are occasionally approached by clients to help them define their company culture, refine their organization’s core values, or develop a set of service expectations. It’s some of our favorite work but we’re going to give away one of the biggest secrets. Each and every one of these exercises begins and ends with communication. Yes, communication, it’s the secret ingredient – but it’s not as simple as it sounds. Perhaps that is why the business lexicon has so much jargon that attempts to work around it.  We have a theory that sometimes the “culture conversation” might just be disguising our real challenge as leaders: talking to our teams. 

Before we lose you – we aren’t suggesting that a well-defined organizational culture isn’t a good thing – but we are telling you it isn’t going to work if communication doesn’t.   

After all, a company’s culture, brand, and values are largely created by the words and subsequent actions of its leaders. And, your employees’ ability to facilitate your desired experience, and share a consistent message with customers, is also predicated on communication. Clever catchphrases and culture materials like books, notecards and screensavers are great, but the spoken and written words of senior leaders will ultimately shape the definition of your culture in the minds of your team. 

Perusing Glassdoor you may be surprised at the employer reviews for well-regarded, even Fortune 100, companies. You feel like you know their brand and their culture – you can see it on the “Who We Are” page of their website or on clever displays in their storefronts. Their employees; however, may not feel the magic.  Poor reviews often feature common challenges like communication in silos, mixed messages, lack of contact with senior level leaders and other concerns that all come back to communication.

Ready for another secret? You may know this one already. Communication is hard. 

…and so is golf, but we think communication just may become the new official sport of executive leadership. If we were running a practice session, here are the drills we would run:

1. Start with who
We checked, Simon Sinek hasn’t yet used that line. We aren’t denying the importance of setting a vision or explaining why, but when crafting those critical messages, it is equally important to consider your who.  

  • Be relevant: Consider the size and demographics of your team, just as your marketers consider their prospects. What channels of communication work best to share information with them? What motivates them to listen, learn or modify behavior? How does your message impact their day, their week, or their role?
  • Be timely: Consider the cadence of your team’s work and how frequently they use shared communication channels and be timely with your delivery. This is easier to do when you establish consistent opportunities to talk to your whole team. 
  • Be real: Use an authentic voice. Even when using a more formal communication channel, approach it conversationally. An email from the CEO is not likely to get lost in the inbox and feels more personal and genuine than a memo from their assistant.  

2. Speak, write, repeat

Our most powerful tool doesn’t always work on the first try. Communications must be delivered consistently, repetitively and deliberately to maximize effectiveness. 

  • Rule of 7: The average person must hear a message 7 times before committing it to memory. If you are using communication to change behavior, create significant meaning, or reinforce your culture, a one and done communication plan will not serve you well.  If the Rule of 7 is overwhelming, start with the power of 3. For example, a senior leader communicates to the whole staff, the supervisor reinforces with individual conversations, a written note comes shortly after to reinforce the message.  
  • It’s called a “brief”: The number of times a person needs to hear a message shouldn’t be confused for the need of an abundance of detail. In fact, the more you can simplify your message, the more likely it is to resonate and be memorable. Consider this, if a person were only going to read the first 3 sentences of your email or memo, would they get the essential message? If a person only tuned in for your introductory slide or closing remarks, would they understand the essence of your communication? 
  • Get your FAQs straight:  Communication is not a one-way process, it requires a loop of feedback and questions. To prepare for feedback on your coming communication, brainstorm a list of questions you anticipate your staff will have and prepare your answers. Depending on the scale of your communication and the size of your audience, you could even publish a list of Frequently Asked Questions and Answers following your formal communication. 

3. Special sauce

It’s not just what you say, it’s how you say it 

  • Be humbly incorrect: Committing to communication makes us vulnerable as leaders – especially when we commit our words to writing or answer challenging questions in a live meeting. Don’t stifle the conversation out of a fear of not having all the answers. It is okay to say you don’t know or to follow up and correct a misstep. See exercise 1 – be real.
  • Explain a change in heart: Leaders often make the mistake of holding on to a communication too long for fear something may change after they share it. While we don’t suggest making and breaking promises, we encourage timely communication coupled with a willingness to explain when you had to pivot.
  • Do as you said: We saved one of the most important points for last. We are talking about talk here, but with talking the talk should always come walking the walk. Follow up and follow through will establish trust and ensure your audience wants to hear what you have to say the next time around. 

2019 Executive Leadership Academy Pre-Application!

inFUSION Group is excited to bring its Executive Leadership Academy back for a second year in 2019! Due to class size being limited, we’ve created a pre-application for interested applicants to complete. Please note, a full application will be available the first week of September. If you’ve completed the pre-application, we will send you the full application at that time.

Click this link: INF_ELApreapp_fillable to access the pre-application.

2019 dates are as follow:

April 9-11
June 18-20
August 27-29
October 22-24

If you have questions, please feel free to call us, or send an e-mail to info@in-fusiongroup.com.

 

inFUSION Group Brings Executive Leadership Academy to Michigan!

inFUSION Group, a full-service business consulting firm based in Michigan is pleased to announce details of its 2018 Executive Leadership Academy.

The Executive Leadership Academy will be comprised of four sessions, spaced over seven months in 2018. Attendees of the program will work with all three aspects of leadership: leading self, leading others, and leading the organization. The program is designed for credit union leaders who are motivated, focused and ready to reach their full potential. Interested applicants must possess an ambition to excel. Graduates of the program will learn: core concepts of leadership and management, relationship-building through interpersonal communication, how to make courageous decisions and take action critical to success, how to address and manage change with confidence and action-oriented outcomes, and how to think, plan and effectively execute credit union initiatives.

Jessica Richardson-Isenegger, Senior Partner, Infusion Group states, “We’re looking forward to launching our Executive Leadership Academy in 2018. It’s taken a lot of planning and preparation to bring this to fruition, but we are thrilled to be offering this program to the credit union industry.” Richardson-Isenegger goes on to say, “we are bringing in top-notch faculty, and have an academy that isn’t going to just inspire, it’s going to give our graduates tools they need to be even more successful in both their organization and their professional careers.”

Faculty includes:

Steve Ahlberg, MBA
Jackson Hataway, PH.D.
Juli Lynch, PH.D.

Sessions for 2018 are scheduled as follows:

Session #1: April 10, 11, 12
Session #2: July 10, 11, 12
Session #3: October 16, 17, 18
Session #4: December 4, 5, 6

Interested attendees should contact Infusion Group at info@in-fusiongroup.com or 735.552.5192 for more information. Note, class size is limited and the application deadline is November 1, 2017.

To read and download the Executive Leadership Academy brochure click here.

Politics in the Workplace! Yes or No?

In times past it was generally accepted that, in polite company, you didn’t discuss three distinct topics:  religion, politics and…well…you can guess the other one.  Times have changed and with the advent of social media, many of these traditional ideas seem very quaint!  In the area of elections and the workplace, we have seen big changes over the years that have led to companies thinking about politics in the workplace, how involved a company can be and even if a company wants to be active at all.

Politics and elections can be a challenge in the office environment, especially with the intense interest in years when it is a Presidential election, like 2016.  This environment can be confusing, both for employees and employers.  This brings forth the question of how active should an employer be during an election, and in what way that does not create potential problems.

Like individuals, every employer in every industry in this country has a vested interest in the outcome of an election because lawmakers and Presidents have the ability to create public policy that can have a tremendous impact on any industry, either positively or negatively.

However, there are areas where employers can be involved on varying levels in the election process.  Data developed by the Business Industry Political Action Committee (BIPAC) has shown that employees actually look favorably on information provided from an employer on issues, candidates and elections.  Employers should take the opportunity to provide that information so that employees understand how policy positions of different candidates would impact their industry and the voting process.  This allows employees to make an informed choice when they enter the voting booth and also allows them to consider the impact a particular vote could have on their industry; in some cases a voter will discover that the candidate that is closest to their personal views may not be the best candidate for their industry and that may be something they want to add into the equation when making a voting decision.

All of this might be new for your company, and you might still have concerns about getting involved in deeper activities surrounding an election.  However, one area where you can be involved and have a positive impact is making sure your employees are registered to vote and that they understand the voting process.  Here are some ways to start that process:

  • Consider sponsoring a nonpartisan voter registration drive as part of company events: the company picnic, in-house seminars, brown bag lunches and other similar events at your company.  Encourage your employees to register to vote.
  • Include voter registration material in employee information packets and in welcome kits for new employees.
  • Alert employees as critical dates near including registering to vote for an upcoming election, deadlines to apply for an absentee ballot and the opening of early voting.  Do this for both primaries and general elections.
  • Some states require that employers provide paid time off to vote.  If your state does not have laws requiring this, consider instituting paid time off for people to have time to vote and to remind employees before the election when polls open and close in your state – different states have different times so it is important to know the poll times in your locality.

These are just a few examples where employers can be active in helping their employees participate in citizen democracy.  While an employer never wants to be viewed as trying to force employees to vote a certain way, providing tools to register to vote can go a long way in helping individuals be informed and navigate on Election Day.

Are you interested in knowing what more you can do to educate your employees on the issues?  inFUSION Group can help!

Written By: Christopher R. Brown, CAE
Senior Consultant, inFUSION Group

Popping the Question: Are your Employees Engaged?

It’s no secret that employee engagement and strong organizational culture have been linked to higher customer satisfaction, business profitability and, of course, employee productivity. Companies like Google, Zappos and Zingerman’s have made a name for being great places to work and the rest of the businesses in the alphabet have been scrambling to replicate their successes. But pool tables, free dry cleaning and espresso machines do not a culture make.

So how can you really know if your employees are engaged? How do you find out what makes your people tick and tock around the time clock? Just ask!

Employee engagement surveys may seem passé. You may have even eliminated your old survey for lack of participation or actionable data. But truthfully, asking for open and honest feedback is cooler than ever. Just ask a millennial – they are a third of your workforce!

Speaking of data, here are three stats that should make you reconsider the need to measure engagement:

  • Organizations spend an average of $720 million annually on improving engagement (Bersin, 2012)

Yet…

  • 70% of employees are not engaged in their work (Gallup, 2015)
  • 87% of organizations see employee engagement as one of their biggest challenges (Deloitte, 2015)

When you want to know how your customers feel about your service, you survey them. You host focus groups. You put instant polls on your website and comment cards in your lobby. Those strategies can be equally as effective for your internal customers (noun. Fancy term for employees. See also team members, associates and client success managers).

Renowned firm, Deloitte, says “an organization’s culture can become a key competitive advantage – or it’s Achies’ heel. Culture and engagement are now business issues, not just topics for HR to debate.” They agree that the risks of not knowing extend beyond poor culture and low output, but onto your reputation as sites like Linkedin, Glassdoor and Salary.com tell the world “how things work around here.”

Let’s be clear. Just creating a survey isn’t enough. Your old survey may have been ineffective, and if you’ve never had a survey you may feel like you are steering in the dark – but we can help you right that ship.

Ask not what your employee survey can do for you, but what you can do for your employee survey:

  • Conduct short, meaningful surveys at least annually.
  • Use an external source to create the right questions and design a survey that will get responses.
  • Communicate the results of the survey to all employees.
  • Develop and execute action plans to address common themes in feedback and underlying issues.

Those last two bullet points are critical. In fact, we won’t even accept a handshake – you have to pinky promise that if you ask your employees for feedback, you will respond. An engagement survey can only positively influence your corporate culture if it is followed by a strong communication plan and noticeable change. Think taglines like “We’ve heard you!” or “Your feedback matters!” and be sure to follow them up with substance like “We’re changing our policy…” or “We’re upgrading your…”

We know what you’re thinking – what if you don’t get any good feedback? What if people make impossible demands? Thing is, this isn’t a hostage negotiation. It’s simply listening to people whom you entrust with significant responsibility day in and day out. No matter your brand or your ultimate vision for your corporate culture, you must first establish trust and prove that you’re all playing for the same team. You are united in a common purpose and whether that is solving a social problem or manufacturing goods, listening to one another will improve your chances of shared success.

It’s Not Over till It’s Over: Five Strategies to Improve Your Meetings!

The end of your meeting may be the most important part of all.

Written By: Erika Oliver, PMP

We tend to put great thought into meetings before they happen but less so while they’re winding up. If you want to reap true benefits from your meetings, though, don’t adjourn too quickly. Do these five things at the end of every meeting to give the team the energy to move forward and set the tone for what happens next.

  1. Ask participants to share one thing they’ll do before the next meeting. The most high energy meeting is doomed if people leave without knowing precisely what’s expected of them. Eliminate the “what now?” problem by assuring that each person chooses a task to move the project forward.
  2. Ask each person what tools are needed for next steps. This question helps people think more deeply about what they plan to do before the next meeting. If they’re stalled by missing information or needed support, they’ll stop before they even begin. It’s also important to share how and when the tools and information will be available. Tools aren’t any good if they don’t get in the hands of workers.
  3. Revisit the vision with a question. Show the completed building, the project timeline, the face of the client who will be served. Team members are more likely to follow through on tasks and stay the course if they clearly understand the “why” of a project and, most important, their specific role. Not only is a picture worth a thousand words but it also motivates people and connects them to the larger goal.
  4. Have people share what they consider the most meaningful part of the meeting. This strategy accomplishes four important things: (1) It gives the facilitator feedback about what resonated with the group. (2) It summarizes meeting content for greater information retention. (3) It ends the meeting on a positive note. (4) When people communicate a valuable learning experience, they become more bonded to the group.
  5. Invoke a team cheer or ceremony. Fun is often a missing component in meetings and projects. Providing opportunities to let off steam, celebrate small successes, and just play will go further in motivating people than you might think. Put your hands together and shout, “Go Team!” or share a round of applause for each other. Don’t worry if someone holds back and acts as if it’s “silly” to celebrate. Once they feel the group’s energy, they’ll be first in line for the next team cheer. If nobody’s enjoying the process, what’s the point?

Is Viral Marketing For Your Business?

Every few days, there seems to be a new viral video surfacing online. A couple years ago it was flash mobs, then the Harlem Shake and of course you can never forget the adorably sweet cat videos making the rounds.

The right elements contained within your video can mean the difference of just a few likes, shares or views to millions. You want to keep your video simple, they should strike an emotional cord – whether it be funny or pulls on your heart strings, it should contain an offer of some sort or a connection back to your company.

With a fickle and ever-changing audience mood, viral marketing can be hit or miss. Your idea could be clear genius and relevant and still not garner much of a viral impact or it could be online for two years and then take-off. Knowing this is part of the planning process. For this reason, pumping money into a viral video may not be the right strategy for your organization. Keeping it light, easy and with a ‘homemade’ feel is key. At InFUSION Group we can help you determine if a viral marketing strategy is a good fit for your organization, assist in developing a plan and work with you to get your videos seen.

Our expertise in human resources, marketing, leadership and corporate culture will provide your organization with the tools it needs to sustain and grow your business. At inFUSION Group we strive to implement specific solutions that will work for your particular organization.

Get on Board! Increasing Retention and ROI of New Hires.

Now Hiring

For the first time in a long time, the job market is as busy as the supermarket on Sunday. As of the 3rd Quarter of 2014, there were 4.8 million job openings in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics this was the highest level of job openings since January 2001. Even better yet, we saw a significant net increase in employment after accounting for turnover.

In the thick of budget season, there is no doubt you are counting and recounting your FTEs (full-time equivalents) and forecasting 2015 hiring needs. You’ll account for the basics like salary and benefits, but new hires come with an additional premium – the cost to get them on board. From external costs like job-board postings, screening fees and background checks, to internal costs like recruiting staff and learning and development, a new hire starts costing you money before they even start.

Now, don’t take this the wrong way, we love to see organizations growing and putting people back to work. We just think that your human capital should be looked at like any other investment you make. Maximizing your return on investment isn’t a mere monetary endeavor – it takes time and resources. But when you pay the higher price up front, your returns take a jump, too!

Off Boarding – It Happens

All too often, the best day of a new hire’s employment is the day after their interview. You know – when you celebrate, thinking you struck gold on LinkedIn and scored the perfect person for the job. Fast forward to
usually about two weeks later, and your onboarding efforts may already be starting to get off track:

• The new hire just doesn’t seem to fit in
• The new hire isn’t getting up to speed quickly enough
• There just isn’t enough time to hold his or her hand
• Your training program doesn’t fit the needs of the new hire
• The HR team is small and overworked; the hiring team is short-staffed

The next thing you know, the new hire is a termination time bomb. Maybe they even feel it more than you do. And maybe they move on to a company that doesn’t use terms like “proactive” and “self-directed” to cover up the fact that their new recruits are stranded on a desert island with a training binder and an emergency e-mail contact.

Hire Education

A holistic onboarding program starts with the first new hire contact and doesn’t end until your new recruit reports for work for the 91st day. Think of onboarding like a high-maintenance date. From providing the right job description and setting realistic performance expectations, to supplying them with the right tools (and we don’t just mean a stapler and chair), new relationships require nurturing. If you’ve done well, your new hire…

• Fits in with your culture
• Is committed and engaged
• Has gotten up to speed

Moreover, your organization experiences lower turnover rates, improved brand image and reduced recruiting costs.

Talent is not as easily found as it is squandered. Don’t lose good people by getting off on the wrong foot.

Are You There Success? It’s Me 2014!

How The Rut Was Dug…
2006: the year Twitter was launched, the year Western Union killed the telegram, the year NASA launched the first mission to Pluto (back then it was still a planet), and of course, the economy started to slow down. Then in December of 2007 the recession hit us full blown. Eight years ago, we saw the writing on the wall. We put our corporate growth initiatives into hibernation. We changed our focus from innovation to efficiency, from bolstering profits to protecting capital, and from proactive leadership to conservative management. We hunkered down, saw the light at the end of the tunnel, and coasted our way there.

So, now what? It’s 2014. Our economy is on the upswing, innovation in technology hasn’t slowed since 2006 and consumer confidence is 70% higher than it was at the start of this decade. We should be jumping up and down shouting “carpe diem.” Instead, we are trying to find the best shovel to get us out of our rut. Is it the technology shovel that will upgrade our tools and position our infrastructure for growth; is it the talent shovel that will bring us the brightest innovative minds? While the tools of change are important, it really starts in the collective minds of your leadership. So read on to get elevated.

Why Don’t Organizations Change?
Simply put: change is hard. It’s a long and often dirty process, and even the most informed change
initiatives are subject to the same variables that undermine less well-thought plans: people, technology, processes, money and the overarching culture of our organizations. It’s easy to see these variables as road blocks and avoid change as a result. The best way to overcome these obstacles is to change the way we think of them.

Outdated technology and tools: Over the last decade the recession rut kept many organizations from updating their infrastructure. Getting bogged down in the need to update MCIF, HRIS, and intranet systems will keep you from embarking on large scale change initiatives. While these tools are necessary and help create better programs, updates should not stop you from exploring change and making incremental progress. What’s certain is that these problems can’t continue to be the quiet elephant in the room. Contract an expert to examine your current capabilities, determine the gap between what you have and what you need, then create a plan and budget to get updated.

Sunken cost investments: From time to time, we all buy a bridge. We make investments in programs that look like the airplane to the future, and instead we take a ride on the Titanic. Don’t wait for the last life raft. Just jump ship. So now that you get the metaphor, let’s shoot straight. You spent too much time and money on a failed program; you teeter between frustration and the hope it will just magically click. The truth is, the longer you continue trying to make it work, the more time and money you are wasting. Accepting you are in a rut is the first step to getting out.

Bureaucracy: All that focus on efficiencies has really strengthened your operations. You have a new arsenal of forms, protocols and procedures all coveted by their creators. Strengthening controls is an important measure especially when your organization is subject to regulation and auditing, but have you gone too far? If the reins are too tight, you may stifle innovation. Sure, you need processes, protocols and procedures… but you also need passion! It’s a good time to unwind some of the red tape. Get your administrators on the next hot phrase in pop management text: “adaptive controls.”

Progressive Thoughts from Professional Thinkers
So now that we’ve countered some of your arguments against change, we’ll turn to the experts to discuss how you should reinvigorate your organization. Dan Mroz, PhD and organizational guru, is certain when he tells us, “there is no set formula for innovation,” but he does offer some fantastic suggestions. Hint: it’s all about people. 1) Create a learning environment: Learning encourages collaboration, idea generation and professional development – innovate by drawing out the best in your people and putting them in the right roles. 2) Consider your attitude: If your culture needs to be re-energized, examine the projected attitudes of your leaders. Do you truly encourage an open, honest and collaborative environment? 3) Celebrate small wins: employee recognition is more than just perks and bonuses. Celebrate your employees when they contribute to organizational knowledge. Mroz advises celebrating small wins because it creates an “organic sense of progress.”

Amplify the Message:
Uplift your organization by supporting the developmental needs of your employees.

If brainstorming meetings with your team turn up more roadblocks than possibilities, MIT scholar Clark Gilbert may suggest you need more “Energizers” among you. “Energizers see realistic possibilities; de-energizers see roadblocks.” Energizing your staff by creating a compelling vision for change. Take their minds off of past or current problems by presenting an inspiring possibility for the future. Do be certain that the goals of each member of your change teams are realistic. If it is overwhelming or difficult to execute due to resource issues, the discussions of possibilities will quickly turn back to roadblocks.

Amplify the Message:
Lead change efforts with a strong vision that is both inspiring and realistic.

Ultimately, it’s about recognizing when it’s time to change and taking steps to snap yourself and your organization out of a rut. The Recovering Leader recommends concrete action when you have accepted you are in a rut. Among his advice is the need to “face it” by discussing your organization’s complacency with an advisor who will give it to you straight. He also advises you tackle the “bigger enduring issues” first. Remember the top reasons organizations don’t change? Those reasons are things that can be, well, changed. Rank them in order of importance and knock them out of the way.